25 Aesop Stories That Will Open The Gates of Wisdom

 

Best Aesop Fables Stories To Educate Kids In The Leisure Time

 

Aesop Fable’s Stories For Everyone: Aesop was a Greek fabulist and storyteller credited with a number of fables now collectively known as Aesop’s Fables or the Aesopica. Although his existence remains unclear and no writings by him survive, numerous tales credited to him were gathered across the centuries and in many languages in a storytelling tradition that continues to this day.

Aesop's Fables Stories For Kids

Many of the tales associated with him are characterized by anthropomorphic animal characters. The earliest Greek sources, including Aristotle, indicate that Aesop was born around 620 BCE in Samos, a Greek island in the Northern Aegean. He was born as a slave but had a number of distinctive traits.

The fables originally belonged to oral tradition and were not collected for some three centuries after Aesop’s death. Today, Aesop’s fables have reached countless generations since he is reported to have been alive, and they continue to be a part of the lives of many.

Aesop’s fables are so famous because every story featured imaginary characters, animals, and plants. These fables served as a form of children’s entertainment beyond being a simple teaching tool and transmitting important life lessons while also describing the “world of childhood.”

1. Aesop Fables Story: The Early Life Story of Aesop

A long time ago there lived a poor slave whose name was Aesop. He was a small man with a large head and long arms. His face was white but very homely. His large eyes were bright and snappy. When Aesop was about twenty years old his master lost a great deal of money and was obliged to sell his slaves. To do this, he had to take them to a large city where there was a slave market.

The city was far away, and the slaves must walk the whole distance. A number of bundles were made up for them to carry. Some of these bundles contained the things they would need on the road; some contained clothing; and some contained goods which the master would sell in the city.

“Choose your bundles, boys,” said the master. “There is one for each of you.”

Aesop at once chose the largest one. The other slaves laughed and said he was foolish. But he threw it upon his shoulders and seemed well satisfied. The next day, the laugh was the other way, for the bundle which he had chosen contained the food for the whole party.

When all had eaten three meals from it, it became very much lighter. And before the end of the journey, Aesop had nothing to carry, while the other slaves were groaning under their heavy loads.

“Aesop is a wise fellow,” said his master. “The man who buys him must pay a high price.”

How Did Clever Aesop Free Himself From Slavery

A very rich man, whose name was Xanthus, came to the slave market to buy a servant. As the slaves stood before him he asked each one to tell what kind of work he could do. All were eager to be bought by Xanthus because they knew he would be a kind master. So each one boasted of his skill in doing some sort of labor. One was a fine gardener; another could take care of horses; a third was a good cook; a fourth could manage a household.

“And what can you do, Aesop?” asked Xanthus.

“Nothing,” he answered.

“Nothing? How is that?”

“Because, since these other slaves do everything, there is nothing left for me to perform,” said Aesop.

This answer pleased the rich man so well that he bought Aesop at once, and took him to his home on the island of Samos. In Samos, the little slave soon became known for his wisdom and courage. He often amused his master and his master’s friends by telling droll fables about birds and beasts that could talk.

They saw that all these fables taught some great truth, and they wondered how Aesop could have thought of them. Many other stories are told of this wonderful slave. His master was so much pleased with him that he gave him his freedom. Many great men were glad to call him their friend, and even kings asked his advice and were amused by his fables.

 

Top Stories From Aesop To Impart Moral Education To Toddlers

2. The Ass And The Lapdog Short Story By Aesop

A Farmer one day came to the stables to see to his beasts of burden: among them was his favorite Ass, which was always well-fed and often carried his master. With the Farmer came his Lapdog, who danced about and licked his hand and frisked about as happy as could be. The Farmer felt in his pocket, gave the Lapdog some dainty food, and sat down while he gave his orders to his servants.

The Lapdog jumped into his master’s lap and lay there blinking while the Farmer stroked his ears. The Ass, seeing this, broke loose from his halter and commenced prancing about in imitation of the Lapdog.

The Farmer could not hold his sides with laughter, so the Ass went up to him, and putting his feet upon the Farmer’s shoulder attempted to climb into his lap. The Farmer’s servants rushed up with sticks and pitchforks and soon taught the Ass that clumsy jesting is no joke.

Moral of The Story: Think before you act. Only fools blindly copy others.

3. The Man And The Serpent Story From Aesop

A Countryman’s son by accident trod upon a Serpent’s tail, which turned and bit him so that he died. The father in a rage got his axe, and pursuing the Serpent, cut off part of its tail. So the Serpent in revenge began stinging several of the Farmer’s cattle and caused him severe loss. Well, the Farmer thought it best to make it up with the Serpent and brought food and honey to the mouth of its lair, and said to it:

‘Let’s forget and forgive; perhaps you were right to punish my son and take vengeance on my cattle, but surely I was right in trying to revenge him; now that we are both satisfied why should not we be friends again?’ ‘No, no,’ said the Serpent; ‘take away your gifts; you can never forget the death of your son, nor I the loss of my tail.’

Moral of The Story: Injuries may be forgiven, but not forgotten.

4. Story of Aesop Fables: The Mountains In Labour

One day the Countrymen noticed that the Mountains were in labor; smoke came out of their summits, the earth was quaking at their feet, trees were crashing, and huge rocks were tumbling. They felt sure that something horrible was going to happen. They all gathered together in one place to see what a terrible thing this could be. They waited and they waited, but nothing came.

At last, there was a still more violent earthquake, and a huge gap appeared in the side of the Mountains. They all fell down to their knees and waited. At last, and at last, a teeny, tiny mouse poked its little head and bristles out of the gap and came running down towards them.

Moral of The Story: Much outcry, little outcome.

 

Wonderful Short Stories By Aesop To Entertain Your Kids

5. Aesop Story: The Swallow And The Other Birds

It happened that a Countryman was sowing some hemp seeds in a field where a Swallow and some other birds were hopping about picking up their food. ‘Beware of that man,’ quoth the Swallow. ‘Why, what is he doing?’ said the others. ‘That is hemp seed he is sowing; be careful to pick up every one of the seeds, or else you will repent it.’

The birds paid no heed to the Swallow’s words, and by and by the hemp grew up and was made into cord, and of the cords, nets were made, and many a bird that had despised the Swallow’s advice was caught in nets made out of that very hemp. ‘What did I tell you?’ said the Swallow: If you would have acted wisely you wouldn’t be in this gloomy state.

Moral of The Story: Destroy the seed of evil, or it will grow up to your ruin.

6. The Hares And The Frogs Short Story By Aesop

The Hares were so persecuted by the other beasts, they did not know where to go. As soon as they saw a single animal approach them, they used to run. One day they saw a troop of wild Horses stampeding about, and in quite a panic all the Hares scuttled off to a lake hard by, determined to drown themselves rather than live in such a continual state of fear.

But just as they got near the bank of the lake, a troop of Frogs, frightened in their turn by the approach of the Hares scuttled off and jumped into the water. ‘Truly,’ said one of the Hares, ‘things are not so bad as they seem’.

Moral of The Story: There is always someone worse off than yourself.

7. The Dog And The Shadow Story From Aesop

It happened that a Dog had got a piece of meat and was carrying it home in his mouth to eat it in peace. Now on his way home, he had to cross a plank lying across a running brook. As he crossed, he looked down and saw his own shadow reflected in the water beneath.

Thinking it was another dog with another piece of meat, he made up his mind to have that also. So he made a snap at the shadow in the water, but as he opened his mouth the piece of meat fell out, dropped into the water, and was never seen more.

Moral of The Story: Beware lest you lose the substance by grasping at the shadow.

 

Inspiring Stories of Aesop Fables To Unlock The Gates of Wisdom

8. The Woodman And The Serpent Story From Aesop

One wintry day a Woodman was tramping home from his work when he saw something black lying on the snow. When he came closer he saw it was a Serpent to all appearance dead. But he took it up and put it in his bosom to warm while he hurried home. As soon as he got indoors he put the Serpent down on the hearth before the fire.

The children watched it and saw it slowly come to life again. Then one of them stooped down to stroke it, but the Serpent raised its head and put out its fangs and was about to sting the child to death. So the Woodman seized his axe, and with one stroke cut the Serpent in two.

Moral of The Story: No gratitude from the wicked.

9. Aesop Story For Kids: The Jay And The Peacock

A Jay venturing into a yard where Peacocks used to walk, found there a number of feathers that had fallen from the Peacocks when they were molting. He tied them all to his tail and strutted down towards the Peacocks. When he came near them they soon discovered the cheat, and striding up to him pecked at him and plucked away his borrowed plumes.

So the Jay could do no better than go back to the other Jays, who had watched his behavior from a distance; but they were equally annoyed with him, and scolded him in one tone.

Moral of The Story: It is not only fine feathers that make fine birds.

10. Short Story By Aesop: The Cock And The Pearl

A cock was once strutting up and down the farmyard among the hens when suddenly he espied something shining amid the straw. ‘Ho! ho!’ quoth he, ‘that’s for me,’ and soon rooted it out from beneath the straw. What did it turn out to be but a Pearl that by some chance had been lost in the yard?

‘You may be a treasure,’ quoth Master Cock, ‘to men that prize you, but for me, I would rather have a single barley-corn than a peck of pearls.’

Moral of The Story: Precious things are for those that can prize them.

 

Beautiful Stories By Aesop That Will Teach You A Great Lesson

11. The Belly And The Members Story By Aesop

One fine day it occurred to the Members of the Body that they were doing all the work and the Belly was having all the food. So they held a meeting, and after a long discussion, decided to strike work till the Belly consented to take its proper share of the work. So for a day or two, the Hands refused to take the food, the Mouth refused to receive it, and the Teeth had no work to do.

But after a day or two the Members began to find that they themselves were not in a very active condition: the Hands could hardly move, and the Mouth was all parched and dry, while the Legs were unable to support the rest. So thus they found that even the Belly in its dull quiet way was doing necessary work for the Body and that all must work together or the Body will go to pieces.

Moral of The Story: Unity is the Strength.

12. The Man And The Wood: A Short Aesop Story

A Man came into a Wood one day with an axe in his hand and begged all the Trees to give him a small branch that he wanted for a particular purpose. The Trees were good-natured and gave him one of their branches. What did the Man do but fix it into the axe head, and soon set to work cutting down tree after tree. Then the Trees saw how foolish they had been in giving their enemy the means of destroying themselves.

Moral of The Story: Never help a person of wicked nature.

13. The Wolf And The Kid Story From Aesop

A Kid was perched up on the top of a house, and looking down saw a Wolf passing under him. Immediately he began to revile and attack his enemy. ‘Murderer and thief,’ he cried, ‘what do you here near honest folks’ houses? How dare you make an appearance where your vile deeds are known?’ ‘Curse away, my young friend,’ said the Wolf.

Moral of The Story: It is easy to be brave from a safe distance.

 

Amazing Aesop Stories That Will Make You More Intelligent

14. Aesop Fables Stories: Who Will Hang The Bell

An old Cat was in a fair way to kill all the Mice in the barn. One day the Mice met to talk about the great harm that she was doing them. Each one told of some plan by which to keep out of her way. An old gray Mouse that was thought to be very wise said, “Do as I say, Hang a bell to the Cat’s neck. Then, when we hear it ring, we shall know that she is coming, and can scamper out of her way.”

“Good! Good!” said all the other Mice; and one ran to get the bell.

“Now which of you will hang this bell on the Cat’s neck?” said the old gray Mouse.

“Not I! Not I!” said all the Mice together. And they scampered away to their holes.

Moral of The Story: It’s always easy to give advice than to act.

15. The Man And The Wooden God Story By Aesop

In the old days, men used to worship stocks and stones and idols and prayed to them to give them luck. It happened that a Man had often prayed to a wooden idol he had received from his father, but his luck never seemed to change. He prayed and he prayed, but still, he remained as unlucky as ever.

One day in the greatest rage he went to the Wooden God, and with one blow swept it down from its pedestal. The idol broke in two, and what did he see? An immense number of coins flew all over the place.

Moral of The Story: Laziness breeds poverty.

16. Aesop Story: The Bald Man And The Fly

There was once a Bald Man who sat down after work on a hot summer’s day. A Fly came up and kept buzzing about his bald pate and stinging him from time to time. The Man aimed a blow at his little enemy, but acks palm came on his head instead.

Again the Fly tormented him, but this time the Man was wiser and said: ‘You will only injure yourself if you take notice of despicable enemies.’

Moral of The Story: Avoid the company of shameless & wicked people.

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